We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families

We wish to inform you…

Who: Rwanda, 1994.

Why: Simple answer: The final kindling of a flame, centuries old, leading to a massive flare, hundreds of thousands dead.

Should I read it: Yes.

Qq: “Rwanda had the memories and the habits of a long past, yet the rupture in that past had been so absolute that the country I was driving through was a place that has never existed before” Pg. 180

Surviving violence is often an extension of the pain one has escaped. Indeed, when that pain is caused by your neighbour, your in-law, your priest, your government, surviving is a rebirth into an essentially different world. An intriguing, if slightly undeveloped, aspect of We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families, is Gourevitch’s focus on the survivors of the genocide. Having provided an indepth look at the forces behind the genocide, (“genocide is never spontaneous”) Gourevitch seeks to understand how the survivors battled the fears, guilt, and hopes that came with that position. He asks, along with the Rwandans he interviews, how to face western forces that first helped feed into the hate and propaganda spurring Hutus to kill hundreds of thousands of their Tutsi friends, in-laws, congregation members, neighbours, using only machetes, then turned away from requests to intervene and stop the violence, provided aid to perpetrators-turned-refugees, and then arrogantly demanded that both Tutsi and Hutu fractions put aside their differences, like little children, and live together again. (Desmond Tutu urged them to bond over their shared blackness). In many ways, Gourevitch attempts to underscore the efforts of the people and the nation as a whole, not to pretend to move past their pain, but in light of their shared and individual experiences of violence, loss, and devastation, answer the bigger question, “now what?” Should the violence be forgotten? Should it be commemorated (Rwanda now has a national holiday in remembrance of the genocide), can the batutsi reach out to the bahutu? Can a tutsi woman raped during the genocide love her enfant mauvais souvenir, child of her hutu rapist? When does the pain go away? Gourevitch’s recount is not just a piece of investigative journalism, it’s not just a westerner attempting to piece together a foreign story, it’s an insight into what it means to experience the extreme violence humanity carries out against humanity, and what it means to survive, to find the right words to ask questions with no compact answers, to seek an amorphous justice, to understand the limitations of retribution, and to live. We Wish to Inform You, is not light reading, it’s necessary reading.

We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families by Philip Gourevitch

Pcador | 1999 | ISBN: 9780312243357

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

Who: Ishmael Beah

What: The coming of age story of a boy soldier in Sierra Leone

Why: War

Should I read It: Absolutely!

Qq: ‘When I was little, my father used to say, “If you are alive, there is hope for a better day and something good to happen. If there is nothing good left in the destiny of a person, he or she will die”’ –Pg 54

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, leaves behind the distant jargon of discourse surrounding war, and in a gorgeously frank voice shows us the humanity such discourse avoids. When we hear about rebels taking over a city, women raped before their families, suicide bombers in crowded marketplaces, and focus on the violence, we catalogue it as ‘news’ but never engage with the emotions, the people, the humanity lost, found, and altered within such violence. Memoirs of a Boy Soldier isn’t just about war, it’s more than a coming of age story in a desperate situation, it’s a tender vice that slowly expands reader’s understanding of how much humanity is. A Long Way Gone shows that in spite of all the pain and horrors humanity can inflict and accommodate, the lengths the human spirit will go to hold us together, to reach out to other people, and find in our hearts, new spaces to call home. Beah notes, “If there is nothing good left in the destiny of a person, he or she will die” (54). A Long Way Gone is evidence that perhaps there is always good lying ahead, and the human spirit is capable of fighting very hard to get there.

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Sarah Crichton Books | 2007 | ISBN: 918-0-374-53126-3

Check out our interview with Ishmael Beah here. 


Our goal here at the newly established (!) ABR is to provide a platform to truly engage with African arts from a literacy perspective, exploring new, established, and upcoming African writers.

Books are a portal into our world, yes, the Africa that is never shown on television, the Africans who are always silent props in the western imagination, books give them the chance to not just speak the truths that they have spoken for centuries but to be heard and actively listened to by the rest of the world.

But we don’t want to only talk about books, we want to engage with Africa and Africans in as many ways as possible and explore what it means, not just to be African, but to be human.

So we thought, we’d have projects. Each month, with each book reviews, we’d have a special project about Africa/Africans/Literature.

We’re just starting out but we’re really excited to see where this goes and watch as more people become not only acquainted with but intimately connected to African Literature.